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CATARACT AND GLAUCOMA CENTER

610 South 8th Street, El Centro, CA 92243
534 South 8th Street, El Centro, CA 92243
760-335-3737

Home About Dr. Chavez Services Laser Services Contact Testimonials FAQ
   •  YAG Laser Capsulotomy
   •  YAG Laser Iridotomy
   •  Laser Iridoplasty
   •  Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT)

YAG Laser Capsulotomy
TO CLEAR THE VISION AFTER A CATARACT OPERATION

After modern cataract surgery, it is common for a plastic lens to be placed in the eye, replacing the eye's own lens. Sometimes the transparent membrane against which the plastic lens is placed begins to go cloudy, making it difficult to see clearly. This usually happens some weeks or months after the cataract operation.

The YAG laser is used to clear the membrane and restore clear vision. The treatment takes just a few minutes in the outpatient clinic, and involves very little discomfort.

Eye drops may be given to dilate the pupil, and to numb the front of the eye before a special contact lens is placed on it. A beam of red light is used to aim the laser before it is operated. You may hear a 'click' each time the laser is fired.

Afterwards, it is sometimes necessary for more eye drops or tablets to be dispensed. They help to protect against any short-term increase of pressure in the eye.

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YAG Laser Iridotomy
LASER IRIDOTOMY IS A SURGICAL PROCEDURE USED TO TREAT CLOSED-ANGLE GLAUCOMA

Laser Iridotomy: A small hole is made in the iris to create a new way for the aqueous fluid to drain from your eye. This laser procedure is also performed in patients who are at risk for closed-angle glaucoma. As with many medical conditions, it is preferable to treat patients at risk and thereby avoid vision loss.

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Laser Iridoplasty
LASER IRIDOPLASTY IS A SURGICAL PROCEDURE USED TO TREAT PLATEAU IRIS SYNDROME AS WELL AS OTHER ANTERIOR SEGMENT CONDITIONS.

Laser Iridoplasty: Uses a low-energy laser that burns the peripheral iris in order to widen the anterior chamber. It effectively treats a wider range of anterior segment conditions. The laser treatment takes only a few minutes in the outpatient clinic. Drops are use to constrict the pupil and to numb the front of the eye.

Plateau iris syndrome, the most common for which the procedure the procedure is indicated, is caused by large or anteriorly positioned ciliary that pushes the iris forward towards the trabecular meshwork. Plateau iris is one of the most common angle-closure glaucomas presenting in younger patients.

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What is closed-angle glaucoma?

Like other forms of glaucoma, closed-angle glaucoma has to do with pressure inside the eye. A normal eye constantly produces a certain amount of clear liquid called aqueous humor, which circulates inside the front portion of the eye. An equal amount of this fluid flows out of the eye through a very tiny drainage system (called the drainage angle), thus maintaining a constant level of pressure within the eye.

There are two main types of glaucoma. The most common type is open-angle glaucoma in which fluid drains too slowly from the eye and causes a chronic rise in eye pressure. In contrast, closed-angle glaucoma causes a more sudden rise in eye pressure. In closed-angle glaucoma, the drainage angle may become partially or completely blocked when the iris (the colored part of the eye) drops over this area. The iris may push forward and completely block the aqueous fluid from leaving the eye, much like a stopper in a sink. In this situation, the pressure inside the eye can rise very quickly and cause an acute closed-angle glaucoma attack.

Symptoms of an acute closed-angle glaucoma attack include:

   •  Severe ocular pain and redness
   •  Decreased vision
   •  Colored halos
   •  Headache
   •  Nausea
   •  Vomiting

Because raised eye pressure can damage the optic nerve and lead to vision loss, a closed-angle glaucoma attack must be treated immediately.

Unfortunately, individuals at risk of developing closed-angle glaucoma often have few or no symptoms prior to the attack.

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Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT)

SLT does not rely on medicines, instead uses an advanced laser system to target only specific cells of the eye - those containing melanin, a natural pigment. This allows for only these cells to be affected, leaving surrounding tissue intact. As a result your body's own healing response helps lower the pressure in your eye.

Benefits of SLT

Safe: SLT is not associated with systemic side effects or the compliance and cost issue of medications.

Selective: SLT utilizes selective photothermolysis to target only specific cells, leaving the surrounding tissue intact.

Smart: SLT stimulates the body's natural mechanisms to enhance outflow of the fluid in your eye.

Sensible: SLT therapy is reimbursed by Medicare and many other insurance providers, which minimizes your out-of-pocket expenses.

EARLY DECTECTION

Vision loss from glaucoma is permanent but can usually be prevented with early detection and treatment. Glaucoma management is usually a lifelong process that requires frequent monitoring and constant treatment. Since there is no way to determine if glaucoma is under control based on how a person feels, doctors visits should be on a regular basis.

HOW SLT WORKS

Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) is an advancement over other lasers that have been used safely and effectively in the treatment of open-angle glaucoma for more than two decades.

SLT works by using laser light to stimulate the body's own healing response to lower your eye pressure. Using a special wave length and energy, the laser affects only pigmented (melanin containing) cells of your eye. SLT improves the flow of fluid in the eye, which in turn lowers your eye pressure. This 15-minute office procedure often reduces or eliminates the need for lifelong use of expensive eye drops.

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